Spooky Symbols: The Wasteland

Marshy wasteland

Find out the significance of The Wasteland in spooky and fantasy literature in the latest of the Spooky Symbols series!

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Posted in fantasy fiction

Book Review: The 100 & The 100: Day 21 by Kass Morgan

The 100 by Kass Morgan

Kass Morgan’s The 100: Heroes meets Lost in a teen post-galactic melodrama that’s ideal for action fans looking for a first taste of sci fi.

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Posted in fantasy fiction

Halloween Crafts: Jam Jar Lanterns

Frankenstein Halloween Jamjar Lantern

I know what you’re thinking – pumpkins make perfectly good Halloween lanterns, so why reinvent the wheel on this one? Well for one thing, you can’t really make pumpkin lanterns too far in advance – they go a bit soft

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Posted in Uncategorized

Spooky Symbols: The Cauldron

Spooky symbols: halloween look at spooky symbols in books and film

  There’s a chill in the air. The nights are drawing in. And shops across the land are filling up with pumpkins and sweeties. That must mean it’s almost Halloween! So I’m taking a look at some of the symbols

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Posted in fantasy fiction

Book Review: A Song for Ella Grey

A Song for Ella Grey by David Almond

A Song for Ella Grey by David Almond – 2 out of 5 stars Source: ARC from Netgalley Published by: Hachette Children’s Books Released: 2nd October 2014 Buy it from: Hive In a nutshell: A Song for Ella Grey is…

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Posted in fantasy fiction

Friday Five: Stories of the past that speak to the future

Friday Five - blog challenge

Before I get started on this week’s Friday Five, let me say first of all that I’m sorry it’s been a bit quiet over here this week. Work has been insanely busy and this is the first time this week

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Posted in fantasy fiction

Friday Five: Fantastic Retellings

Friday Five - blog challenge

Hans Christian Andersen, Perrault, The Brothers Grimm. We think we know where our fairy stories come from. The stories we hear from the earliest age and carry inside us as we grow up. But even those 18th and 19th Century

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Posted in fantasy fiction, feminism

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